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Author Topic: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH  (Read 924 times)

Barking_spiders

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Did anyone ask for a "meet the family" oneshot?
No.
Did I write one anyway?
Yes.

I wrote this as a oneshot, but it's a long oneshot and it exceeds the maximum character count on this forum, so I'm posting it in parts.

Background: this takes place shortly after Goliath, but before The Great Dress Fic-Which-Is-Canon Bestowed Upon us By the Great Scott.

[Part I]

"Skittish," said Bovril, staring out the window at the night-shrouded hills of Scotland.

The loris was right. Though it had been over a year since Deryn had seen her ma and aunties, she didn't seem at all the excited homecoming soldier. Instead a storm cloud hung over her brow, restlessly tapping her fingers on her knee and humming tunes Alek believed to be drinking ballads under her breath. She had tried drawing, but gave up after crumpling three sketches of Bovril into frustrated wads.

Deryn had good reason for apprehension: the last time she'd seen the female members of her family, they'd tried to force her to be the kind of girl Deryn could never be, and had held secret hopes her dreams of joining the Air Service would be dashed. Now, Deryn was returning, disappointed and humiliated, but wildly successful: a world-famous adventurer and decorated officer in His Majesty's Royal Air Service. How would her ma and aunties react?

Alek was nervous as well, though for an entirely different reason: he was going to meet Deryn's family.

He hadn't had much time to think, what with all the hullabaloo of procuring Deryn's honorable discharge from the Service, renouncing Alek's claim on the Austro-Hungarian throne as well as his connections to the Tesla Foundation, and dealing with the press coverage the announcement had warranted. They only had these few day of leave because of the time Dr. Barlow required to fill out the vast amount of paperwork for their membership in the Zoological Society of London. It had occurred to him sometime yesterday, when Deryn said they would be meeting up with her brother Jaspert: Alek had told the world (well, really, he had told Eddie Malone, but the result was the same) he had given up the throne for love without the slightest clue as to how the girl's family felt about the matter.

To be fair, it was never something he'd had to worry about before. All his life, Prince Aleksandar of Hohenberg had taken it as a given that his marriage would be arranged, royal or not. It was simply the way things were done in his family. But now Alek was a commoner, and he would have to impress his future in-laws, and he hadn't the faintest clue how that was to be done.

Alek had already been through the trial-by-fire earlier in the day. They were at the Darwinist equivalent of a train station, waiting for the elephantine-cart to arrive. When Deryn left temporarily to take advantage of the facilities before they left London, Jaspert had pinned down the prince with a hard look and asked him what Alek's intentions were with his sister. Alek flushed immediately, but managed to clear his throat and explain sincerely and succinctly that Deryn meant the world to him, and that he wanted nothing but happiness for her, adding that he hoped to marry Deryn someday, if she would have him. Jaspert seemed satisfied with this answer, but still made it clear that if Alek ever harmed Deryn in any way, the punishment would be swift and horribly painful. Alek has swallowed, but managed to say he was pretty sure whatever Deryn would to to him would be much worse. This made Jaspert laugh (though Alek hadn't been trying to be funny), and seemed to solidify the brother's approval.

"This conversation wasn't as bad as I was expecting", Alek had said.

"Aye," Jaspert had replied, a wicked gleam in his eye, "But you still have to talk to my mother."

And now Alek was mildly terrified again.

And this...carriage-thing wasn't helping either. It was pulled by a beastie fabricated from what Alek supposed were the life-threads of an ox--he would really have to start learning these things, now that he was a Darwinist zookeeper, at least on paper--but it was surprisingly fast. Of course, this was not the rhythmic, lulling speed of a train, nor the familiar oscillation of a walker, but the jarring, jostling, jolting speed of an animal running at top speed across dirt-paved roads at night.

All-in-all, Aleksander Hohenberg was feeling rather queasy.

"We're here." said the driver.

That seemed to shake Deryn out of her thoughts. She stood, kicking Jaspert in the shin.

"Wake up, ya lazy bum-rag," she said, kicking him lightly in the shin. Jaspert jerked awake, swearing expertly when he hitting his head on the ceiling. The siblings had an odd relationship, or so it seemed to Alek, who himself was a single child. When brother and sister had re-united after almost a year spent apart, they embraced like old friends, before Jaspert mussed Deryn's hair, and Deryn threatened to punch him. The vernacular of their affection was a rainbow of profanity. The siblings really loved each other, though: Jaspert had put himself at no small risk by helping smuggle Deryn into the army, and Alek knew there was nothing Deryn wouldn't do for her brother. So this was what Alek had been missing all those lonely years in his childhood castle.

As Jaspert grabbed his bag and clambered out of the car to pay the driver, Alek picked up his bag and Deryn's. Deryn held out a hand for Bovril to scamper onto her arm.

"Hey," Alek said. "I'm sure they'll be proud. What mother wouldn't be?"

"Mine, possibly," Deryn said. Uncertainty didn't suit her, Alek thought.

"Well, at the very least, no one would dare stuff you into skirts now!" said Jaspert, poking his head back into the car. Smiling like that, Jaspert looked a lot like Deryn, even though he had beard-scruff a different sort of nose.

It was true--Deryn had made sure her contract with the Zoological Society of London had already been drawn up and signed before going back home for a reason.

Besides that, Deryn looked the part. She had worn her fancy dress uniform, emblazoned with the symbol of His Majesty's Royal Air Service, a white patch with a shell and series of lines declaring her rank of midshipman. Her Air Gallantry Cross was pinned to the breast of her jacket, gleaming in the moonlight.

She smiled at that, held her head high, and marched out of the car and up the short path connecting the main road to the door of the Sharp family home.

Here goes nothing, thought Alek, then followed her.

[Continued in Part II]
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Barking_spiders

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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2016, 09:01:10 AM »

[Part 2]

The door opened, warm light flooding out into the night. Alek heard a high lilt, similar to Deryn's undisguised voice, fussing over how tall Jaspert had gotten. Deryn arrived--Alek only a few steps behind her--just as Jaspert was pulled inside by someone within the house.

"Darwin's pigeons, is that really you, Deryn?" said the tall woman in the doorway. She wore a cooking apron over a calico dress in a lovely, if somewhat faded, brown pattern. Her grating hair was pulled away from her face, which appeared stern, but kind. She had the same long nose as her children, and her face seemed too lined for a woman of only forty; rather like Count Volger, Alek supposed. She absentmindedly fingered a ring on a chain around her neck.

She hugged Deryn tightly. "How I've missed you, darling." Deryn smiled softly, and returned her mother's embrace. Alek felt like a trespasser on such an intimate moment--especially now that it seemed both women were in danger of crying.

Luckily he was saved by one of The Aunties.

"Deryn's brought a boy home!" squealed a strident voice. A jewel-bedecked hand pulled Alek into the house. It was a cozy place, built of fabricated wood. A worn natural-wood table stood in the center of the main room, cushions on its chairs. Framed embroidery hung on the walls beside a gleaming pots and pans. Wonderful and foreign scents drifted from the pots on the stove. Beyond the kitchen he could see a snug sitting room outfitted with couches, a love seat, and a rocking chair. A fire crackled in the stone fireplace, the mantle of which was laden with old framed photographs and such.

Alek barely had a chance to register these things, however, before he was confronted with the reality of the aunt who had pulled him inside. She looked to be younger than Deryn's ma, and though perhaps this was a result of her manner of dressing. If Deryn's mother's style was simple and practical, this aunt was overdressed and almost gaudy. Her hair was relatively short for a lady, topped by a fashionable round hat. Her neck and wrists were adorned with jewelry (Alek couldn't tell if it was genuine or not) and no less than five rings. In her heels, she stood taller than Alek. Her makeup, including bright red rogue, had been applied liberally.

"And a handsome boy, no less!" she said, holding Alek out at arm's length to get a good look at him. It was rather disconcerting. "However did Deryn manage to catch a prize of a lad like you dressed up like that?"

"I'm right here, you know!" yelled Deryn from the doorway.

Alek smiled diplomatically. "All part of her charm, I suppose. Your niece is quite a wonder, Miss...?"

"Oh, I'm so sorry dear! Where are my manners? My name is Agnes." She stretched a glittering hand out to be kissed. Alek kissed the air above it; Dern had said both of her aunts were unmarried.

"What's that accent, boy?" said a third woman. This one appeared to be the eldest of the trio, sand the most severe. Her hair was pulled into a tight bun, revealing arching eyebrows and a face which seemed more accustomed to frowning that smiling. Despite her back being straight as a board--making her nearly the same height as Alek (everyone in this family was so blasted tall)--she walked with a wooden walking stick, the top of which was carved into the shape of a unicorn.  Her storm-grey frock was of an older style, with a straight line of buttons up the front, from the floor to the brooch at her neck. She wore a knitted shawl around her shoulders. "Sounds Clankerish," she said.

"It is, madam," said Alek. "I'm from Austria-Hungary. Or, I was, before the war. I'm sorry, allow me to introduce myself--my name is Aleksandar Hohenberg." Alek had decided to fashion the last bit of his former title into a surname, now that he had to have one.

"Gertrude," said the lady firmly. She did not look like she wanted to be touched, so Alek simply bowed at the waist.

"Mr. Hohenberg," said Bovril.

Aunt Agnes gasped. "You're that prince, aren't you! The one who's been in the papers!"

"Aye," said Deryn. Alek turned to see her leaning against the doorframe, looking quite displeased. "And you know who else has been in the papers? Me, your actual niece, whom you haven't seen for half a year."

Aunt Agnes shrieked in absolute delight, completely ignoring Deryn, and scaring Alek quite a lot.

Gertrude's eyebrows had shot straight up. "A prince, eh?" She began to walk in a slow circle around him, her cane thunking heavily on the floor with each agonizing.

"Not anymore," said Alek, somehow managing to keep his voice straight.. "I renounced my claim on the throne in favor of a simpler, more meaningful life."

"A life with my daughter, you mean." He turned to see Mrs. Sharp standing near the stove, arms folded. She looked very much like Deryn in that moment.

Alek opened his mouth, uncertain of what to say. He had never imagined this conversation taking place in front of everyone.

Luckily, Deryn saved him once again. "Can we wait to interrogate Alek until at least after dinner?" said Deryn.

"Aye, I'm starving," said Jaspert, though he seemed amused by the whole affair.

So they sat down at the table, Alek next to Deryn, the aunties facing them on the other side of the table. Jaspert began to pull the rocking chat over, before seeing the plate and utensils set at the head of the table.

"Ma, are you sure...?" he asked.

"Yes," she said curtly, setting dishes on table.

Jaspert looked to Deryn, who stared at the chair for a long moment, then nodded once.

And just like that, Jaspert Sharp took his father's place at the head of the table.
[Continued in Part III]
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Barking_spiders

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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2016, 09:07:43 AM »

[Part III]

Before Sarajevo, Alek and his parents would usually sit at one end of a very long dining table, a vast array of silverware before them, and servers brought out food on silver trays as the three of them held a discussion that echoed around the fancy dining hall.

Not so in the Sharp family.

Grace was said, and immediately the whole table broke out into noise.

"Please pass the greens," said Agnes.

"Oh, no you don't!" said Jaspert, poking Deryn's fork out of the way, "I was going for that piece!"

"How many times do I have to remind, you, Agnes, the salt and pepper are married!" said Gertrude.

"Unlike you," said Agnes under her breath.

"Deryn, I think that's quite enough potatoes," said her mother

"Excuse me?" said Gertrude.

"Barking spiders!" said Bovril.

"I don't believe we've been properly introduced, young man," said Deryn's mother.

It took Alek a moment to realize he was being addressed.

"Oh, I'm terribly sorry, madam!"

"Don't be," she replied. "It's impossible to get a word in in this family."

"My name is Aleksandar Hohenberg."

"Margaret."

"It's an honor to meet you, madam."

"The pleasure is mine," she replied. "I don't think we ever thought the day would come when Deryn would bring a boy home."
 
"If you don't mind my asking, Mrs. Sharp," Alek asked, "How is it you all know Deryn and I are...romantically involved?"

Margaret Sharp chuckled. "If you weren't, do you think Deryn would subject you to, well, this?" she said, gesturing to the mild chaos of the dinner affair.

"Honestly, I think it's rather nice," said Alek sincerely. He preferred warm and comfortable chaos to reserved gentility any day. It was rather like the mess hall on the Leviathan.

"That's one way to describe it," said Margaret. "I take it this is a far cry from dinner in your family--oh, I'm sorry, dear, I didn't to bring up--"

"It's quite alright," Alek waved her apologies away. The pain of his parents' deaths wasn't so fresh anymore, especially since the whole world was literally up in arms over it.

"It must be awful, having to grieve on the public stage," Mrs. Sharp said. "It was bad enough for us, with Artemis's death being the buzz of Glasgow. Made it so much harder on poor Deryn. I can't imagine what it would be like to have one's family business be the subject of the whole world's conversation."

Alek looked at her for a moment. There was genuine sympathy in Margaret's face. "Yes," he said. "Yes, you put it perfectly." Alek went back to cutting his meat. "But hopefully, that will be over, now that I'm no longer royalty."

"Hullabaloo!" said Bovril, snatching one of the potato chunks off Deryn's plate.

"My, what is that creature?" asked Gertrude.

"Perspicacious," said Bovril, looking pleased with himself.

"It's a perspicacious loris," said Alek.

"Dr. Barlow," said Deryn,"the boffin who got us those jobs with the Zoological Society of London, that is, fabricated a dozen of these talkative little beasties for the sultan of the Ottoman Empire, but this is only one of the two that survived."

"Then what is it doing in our kitchen?" asked Agnes.

"It fixated on Alek," said Deryn, around a bite of potato. "And then it fixated on me, because Alek and I were fixated on each other."

"Come again? We can't all be literal zookeepers." said Jaspert.

"It's like baby ducks," Alek said. Every eye in the room turned to look at him. He remembered again what a strange creature he was, a Clanker who'd accepted Darwinism. "Baby ducks do this thing called nascent fixation, where they lock onto the first person the see and that person becomes their mama duck. I was the only person there when Bovril hatched, so I'm the mama duck."

"Bovril?" asked Gertrude. "Like the beef tea?"

"Yes, Auntie Gertrude," said Deryn. "I didn't name it."

"Nor did I," Alek said quickly, "It was our Ottoman friend, Lilit."

"Here, Alek, have another helping of carrots," said Mrs. Sharp.

"So how did the loris fixate on Deryn, exactly?" asked Mrs. Sharp.

"The loris is meant to be a kind of clever-boots pet," said Deryn. "So the lady-boffin designed it to have dual fixation, for the sake of the sultan's wife, I suppose. It bonds with the first person it sees, and the person with whom the mama duck has the strongest bond. Alek and I were already best friends by then, so I became Papa Duck."

"Papa duck," Agnes shook her head incredulously. "You know, Deryn, as worried as I was about your looks being wasted on this soldier endeavor, you do look rather dashing in that uniform."

Deryn perked up quite a bit at that.

"Still unnatural if you ask me," said Gertrude. "Crossdressing." She gave Deryn a hard look. Deryn met her gaze with head held high.

"Still," Gertrude continued, looking at her food, "I suppose it's commendable that you got away with it for so long. You've always been an excellent liar, Deryn."

"Why thank you," said Deryn, happily taking another bite. She'd won that round.

"What kind of meat is this?" Alek asked. "It's very flavorful."

"Haggis," said Deryn. Alek just stared at her, chewing. "Sheep's bladder," she clarified.

Alek froze for a moment, then shrugged. He'd tried scorpion in Istanbul. A little sheep's bladder was nothing.

"Alek, dear, eat some more potatoes," said Mrs. Sharp.
[Continued in Part 4]
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Barking_spiders

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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2016, 09:12:03 AM »

[Part IV]

An hour and several insisted-upon helpings later, Alek sat with Deryn on the love seat in the sitting room, sipping tea. The aunties and Jaspert occupied the couch, and Margaret sat on the rocking chair.

"So, Alek," said Margaret Sharp, her hands folded together as she rocked back and forth, considering him. "First things first,"

"What religion are you?" asked Gertrude, looking quite regal with her hands folded straight out in front of her the head of her walking stick.

"What? No, Gertrude, that wasn't what--" said Mrs. Sharp.

"Well, boy?" said Getrude, staring him down.

"I'm, er, Christian," he said, rather confused.

"Yes, but what kind of Christian?" she insisted.

"Auntie Getrude," said Deryn, "Does it really matter if--"

"The...practicing kind?" he tried, hoping this was the correct answer.

"It's no use, Deryn," said Agnes. "You know how she is."

"Don't play games with me, boy." Auntie Gertrude narrowed her eyes. "Are you Protestant or Catholic?"

Oh, so that was what this is about. "Catholic," said Alek. The pope himself had meddled in Alek's family affairs; he figured you couldn't get much more Catholic than that.

"Fah!" said Aunt Gertrude. The the unicorn cane thumped once against the thick rug that covered the sitting room floor. "I knew it! Oh, no, Deryn, this one's not for you. I'll have you know, boy, we Sharps are proud Kirks!"

"Kirks?" asked Alek.

"Members of the Church of Scotland," said Deryn, rubbing her forehead.

"Pardon me, madam," said Alek, "But...it's still the same Jesus, yes?"

That had clearly been the wrong thing to say. Gertrude looked downright offended.

"Not in Auntie Gertrude's book," said Jaspert.

"God's wounds!" said Bovril. Alek cringed. That loris had it out for him, didn't it?

Gertrude's face twisted into outrage. "You bring this weasel into my home, having taught it to break the second commandment! Now, young man--"

"You know what, Alek?" said Mrs. Sharp. "I think I'd like to have this discussion with you one-on-one."

"Of course, madam." In light of the Aunties, the once-feared solo interrogation seemed like a blessing.

"Come along, then," said Mrs. Sharp.

Alek glanced back at Deryn. She smiled tightly, squeezing his hand.

She led him down a short hallway, which Alek assumed led to the bedrooms. She stopped near the end of the hallway.

"Now, Alek, I must say I'm rather relieved." said Mrs. Sharp.

"Relieved, madam?" Alek asked.

"When my daughter wrote home, saying she was bringing home a boy, I was naturally worried. Deryn had conducted an entire romance far away from where I could see, give advice, watch out for her, guide her." Margaret was pacing now. Alek could see how stressful it must have been to parent a girl like Deryn: headstrong, always doing the opposite of what society demanded she do, and working against every plan her parents might try to make for her. Much like Alek, really.

"And what sort of boy would this fellow be?" Margaret continued. "Deryn spent the past year on a ship in the sky, and sailors aren't exactly renowned for their gentility."

She turned back to Alek. "But instead, she brings home you. A prince. An actual, real-life, heir-to-a-kingdom prince." She laughed a little, shaking her head. "It doesn't even seem like this is something that could happen in real life! A girl dresses up like a boy and goes off to war, then comes home a princess!"

"Er, about that," said Alek. "I'm not a prince anymore. And Deryn isn't a princess; for one thing, we're not married, and even if we were, I'm not a--"

"It's called a figure of speech," said Deryn's ma. "And aye, I know. I read the papers. 'You, lucky Austria, shall marry'. At least I don't have any doubts about your intentions with my daughter," Margaret sighed.

Alek frowned. "You don't? Then why...?"

She looked right at him. "Because I need to know this: what kind of man are you, Prince Aleksandar of Hohenberg? And don't say you're not a prince, young man. I can see it in your eyes."

Alek took a long moment to formulate his answer. It was a difficult question.

"All my life," he began slowly, "I've felt like an impostor. I was an imposter in my family, the son of a lady-in-waiting playing at being royalty. I was an impostor in my escape, a grieving boy wearing the guise of a walker pilot to hide my sadness. Even on the Leviathan I was an impostor, a Clanker prince working alongside commoners and Darwinists, and even worse, wanting to be one of them. In Istanbul I played at being one of the people, a common revolutionary. In America I played at being a world leader, being the person they needed me to be, in the hopes it would bring peace.

"Deryn is the one place I'm not an impostor. Even when we were only friends, I could confide my whole self to her and she accepted me for who I was. It's not worth having an empire if I lose my real self, madam."

Margaret Sharp considered Alek Hohenberg for a long, long moment.

"Alright, then, Aleksandar Hohenberg.  You have my blessing to court my daughter."

Alek couldn't contain a wide grin, taking one of Deryn's mother's hands in both of his. "Thank you, thank you madam! I promise you won't be sorry."

Mrs. Sharp smiled. "I'm just glad it's not that other boy, Deryn's friends with, the monkey Luddite. What's his name, Newshirt?"

"Newkirk!" said Bovril, scampering down the hallway to climb up onto Alek's shoulder.

Alek laughed. "Oh, that's be a sight. Deryn would eat that boy alive!"

"After all," said Deryn, poking her head around the corner, "I am a decorated officer in His Majesty's Royal Air Service!"

"Have you all been eavesdropping?" Alek exclaimed.

"Yup," said Deryn, grinning like a fool.  "Heard every word." Alek groaned.

"That was quite beautiful, young man, what you said about Deryn," said Agnes, blotting her eyes as Alek and Mrs. Sharp say back down in the living room. Jaspert and the Aunties were sipping tea, trying to make it look as if they hadn't just been crowded together by the wall, listening to their conversation.

There was a long pause, before Gertrude, not looking at Alek, simply said, "Blessed are the peacemakers."
Alek smiled.

Margaret Sharp froze, teacup halfway to her lips. "Wait, Deryn...did you say you were a decorated officer?"

"Finally!" Deryn exclaimed. "I've been waiting all barking evening for one of the three of you to notice!"

"I thought that was your father's medal!" said Margaret.

"What kind of soldier wears a medal he didn't earn?" asked Deryn.

"I wouldn't know, I've never been a soldier!" said Deryn's mum. "Come, let's have a look."

Deryn unpinned her medal and gave it to her ma.  Her face was proud, but her voice soft when she said: "The Air Gallantry Cross."

After a moment of examining closely the same medal her husband posthumously received, Margaret Sharp wiped tears away from her eyes.

"Oh, Deryn," she said, voice thick, "I'm so proud of you."

"Let me see!" said Auntie Agnes, snatching the decoration out of her sister's hands. "What did you receive this for?"

Deryn's eyes alighted with the happiness of telling a story. "We were in the middle of a firefight, the kaiser's zeppelins on either side of us, gunning at the poor beastie's flanks. I was topside, hitched to the bosun and Newkirk. Suddenly, a bullet flies out of...."

Bovril took a sip of Alek's tea.

"Bovril," the loris whispered, but no one heard him. They were too busy listening to their returned solider tell her stories by the light of the crackling hearth.
[Fin.]
[please let me know what you think! This is the first fanfiction I've ever written (other than the singular other post I made on this site when I was twelve, which I'd rather not think about *shudders*) and I'm really curious about whether it's any good. Thanks! :)]
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The Primal Song Continues

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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2016, 11:54:33 AM »

I've been wondering for some time how this meeting would go. I love it.
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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2016, 05:21:48 PM »

I usually hate fanfic. This is incredible. It reads just like the book. I love it.
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Barking_spiders

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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2016, 11:00:12 AM »

@GentlemanBesly Thank you so much! That means a lot to me. (^///^)
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Gentlebiscuit

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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2016, 12:29:09 PM »

I'M SERIOUS I love this so much o^o I probably prefer it to the bonus chapter.
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Barking_spiders

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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2016, 12:50:47 PM »

@GentlemanBesley

OMG, REALLY?! I'm so honored!!!
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Gentlebiscuit

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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2016, 01:03:31 PM »

Yes really ;D
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InfiniteKnight

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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2016, 06:39:54 PM »

OMFG!
It was like I was reading that straight from the book! Perfectly capturing the spirit of Leviathan.
Good job!!!!

ps.
more plz ;)
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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2016, 09:50:12 PM »

I KNOW RIGHT? It sounds like Scott wrote it :D
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Re: ARE WE NOT GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE MOTHER AND THE CRAZY AUNTS THOUGH
« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2016, 12:34:53 PM »

I read the first few chapters and expected it to be horrible.

It's not bad as far as fan fiction gos.

I feel like most Leviathan fanfic either gets too dark to really mesh well with the books, gets too smutty, or just doesn't work.

I'll read the rest tomorrow.
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