Scott Westerfeld
Content header

Think of the Parents

July 7th, 2011

I spent yesterday morning listening to the indefatigable Maureen Johnson. She was on the radio with a Wall Street Journal writer best known for decrying the state of young adult lit. You know the drill: “YA is too dark, too depressing, and is bad for the kidz!”

I am not here to argue against fact-free trend pieces, however. Maureen and the internet have already done that and done it well. And, you know, haters gonna hate, and shoddy journalists gonna shod. There’s no way to stop that. Here’s the problem I would like to address instead:

When these issues arise, we writers, librarians, booksellers, teachers, and editors know that the media is overblown and out of touch. We know that the huge boom in YA is helping young readers, because we see it in our in-boxes, our libraries, our stores, and our twitter feeds every day.

Sure, some books aren’t right for some kids. But it’s not like that challenge has recently grown insurmountable. In fact, connecting the right book with the right reader has never been easier. There are more specialist teen librarians than ever before, teenage readers are relentlessly networked, and book reviews from all perspectives are more plentiful than at any other time in human history. (Thank you, the internet.)

But someone has to think of the parents. Especially those who randomly turn on the radio or read the WSJ and are exposed to this alarmism. They may not know how to check out all those amazing stories tweeted on #YASaves. They probably don’t follow comment threads on blogs like this one, where bookish teens prove hourly how smart, supportive, and savvy they are. Many parents don’t know what “DFTBA” means, and thus may not realize how awesome their kids are not forgetting to be.

And the other side in this debate sounds perfectly reasonable. “We just want a conversation! We just want parents to be aware!” And they couch everything in that scary questioning tone: “These books MAY be turning your kids into cutters.” Like when local news promos ask, “Are your cleaning fluids making you hate America? Story at eleven!”

Here’s my problem with this brand of “reasonableness”: Conversations have contexts, and awareness is always flavored by its catalyst. Let’s take two examples . . .

A parent goes into a teenager’s room and says, “I just heard from the wise people at the Wall Street Journal that the books you kids read these days are mostly dark and horrible and will make you cut yourself and take drugs. Let me check your books so I can make sure this is not true!”

Seriously. How do you think that conversation’s going to go?

Eyes will be rolled, tempers will rise, and more than likely this parent will be made to feel dreadfully foolish. (Teenagers are good at this last bit.) Frankly, being easily manipulated by alarmists in the media is not a good look for anyone.

But let’s say a parent goes into that same kid’s room and says . . .

“Hey, I just heard that young adult lit sales have grown by double digits every year for the last decade. You teens read so much that it’s the only profitable part of publishing! And now Hollywood wants to make everything you read into movies, and more adults than ever before are reading YA! And I heard that huge crowds show up at bookstores and rented venues when popular YA writers are in town! And that many YA writers have tens of thousands of followers on the Twitter machine, if not hundreds of thousands! And that every November countless teenagers support each other in WRITING THEIR OWN NOVELS! Holy crap, we didn’t do that in my benighted day of juvenile sloth. It’s just awesome how dedicated you and your peers are to reading. Can you please lend me some of these great books?”

My guess is that this conversation will go rather better. And, unlike the Wall Street Journal, this opening gambit is full of verifiable facts!

Make no mistake, we writers want parents to talk to their kids about books. But don’t do it because some newspaper uses fear to generate web hits. Do it because reading is awesome and your kids are awesome.

There’s a problem here, though. The parents who are reading this post (on a YA writer’s blog) probably don’t need this advice. They can see through the malarky without my help. They’ve already noticed that the only “science” referred to in the WSJ‘s articles was a study of 1970s anti-drug public service announcements. (Because nothing is more relevant to 21st-century young adult literature than 40-year-old TV ads.)

But how do we reach those other parents, the ones whose innocent minds might be corrupted by these fact-missing anxiety-mechants? Parents can’t be expected to protect themselves these days. A recent study of hair cream ads from the 1920s proved that the media’s coverage of YA has gotten 37% darker in the last year alone!

Now, I’m not advocating banning the Wall Street Journal. It has many fine articles in it I’m sure, some of which no doubt cite actual facts instead of the vague impressions of random people wandering YA sections. There are always exceptions, after all, even in newspapers named after the street that recently stole $700 billion of our money.

All I’m asking is that teenagers take an active role in discussing young adult lit with their parents.

Kids, you don’t want your parents’ first exposure to YA to be in the dingy recesses of a fear-mongering financial newspaper. It’s your job to help them understand how twitter hashtags work, what NaNoWriMo stands for, and how to do the nerdfighter hand signal. It’s your duty to introduce them gently to the lighter sides of fan fic, before they stumble across a cache of Snape dub-con Mpreg epic poetry. (Um, maybe just wait till your parents are older before tackling fan fic.)

In many cases, of course, your gentle persuasion may not be enough. Some parents are too easily influenced by frightening images of teenage culture gone awry. Darkness sells, after all. For these, a simple call to the Wall Street Journal will cancel your subscription, saving both money and heartache for your beloved parent. Be sure not to leave an empty space in their lives, however. Ease them over to something more wholesome, like, say, the School Library Journal. They’ll hardly notice the difference.

My main point is this: you understand young adult lit. You get how much it’s grown, how much it means to you. Make sure that your parents understand that too, and they’ll be ear-plugged against the profiteering panic-peddlers wailing like sirens on the rocky shoals of our culture.

Thank you for listening.

103 Responses to “Think of the Parents”

  1. 1
    Geoffrey Stokker
    July 7th, 2011 18:57

    These comments are probably made from the same sort of people who a few years ago spouted the “fact” that all role-playing games are evil and SHOULD NOT BE TOUCHED UNDER FEAR OF ETERNAL DAMNATION.

    I do believe it is important, as you have stated, that you have to match the right book to the right reader. All children mature at different rates, so its important for the parent to gauge whether their child will be able to effectively process the themes in any form of media they are exposed to.

    One cannot shield one’s child forever but you also don’t have to dump them headfirst into the world by themselves and so should walk “down the path” with them with an open mind.

  2. 2
    Red
    July 7th, 2011 19:12

    This. Is. Brilliant.

    Signed,
    40 year old woman with no kids, subscriber to WSJ & currently reading Incarceron

  3. 3
    Bruce Eschler
    July 7th, 2011 19:17

    Great analysis and contribution to yesterday’s ya showdown. As I was reading your post I couldn’t help but think of the questions my parents asked me about playing DnD. The media in the 80′s said it was “dark” and a form of devil worship. To my father’s credit he made his final decision on the topic after talking to me. Some of the kids I knew weren’t so lucky. They’re parents heard it was “dark” so it must be restricted.

  4. 4
    Jared Garrett
    July 7th, 2011 19:18

    Scott,
    I expected to come here, read your piece, and have some arguments to make. I am the happy parent of 6 kids, all of them still quite young but two of them delving into YA now, and so I feel I have a clear perspective on parental units and their fears– which are valid.

    And those fears are even sometimes unreasoning, because love of the child is sometimes quite blinding, and parents are human.

    But you did a nice job. I like that you are putting some responsibility in the teens’ hands. I hope they listen.

    Nice books, by the way.

  5. 5
    Bruce Eschler
    July 7th, 2011 19:20

    LOL! Geoffery, I couldn’t see your comment on my smartphone browser or else I would have just said ditto.

  6. 6
    Emma
    July 7th, 2011 19:21

    This is very thoughtful and brilliant.

  7. 7
    Capella
    July 7th, 2011 19:25

    >>All I’m asking is that teenagers take an active roll in discussing young adult lit with their parents.

    I think you mean “role”?

    Fantastic article. I think you’re right that the teens should speak to their parents about what they’re reading. I don’t think it’s always possible, if the parent is violently against certain things, but I think it’s a good goal to try to hold.

  8. 8
    Constanza
    July 7th, 2011 19:27

    very well said.
    now… how do we make those parents talk to their children?.

  9. 9
    Sarah
    July 7th, 2011 19:27

    I’ve been following this whole mess and you have written a wonderful post that I will gladly pass around. I’m a 27 year old librarian and, although I specialize in music, I have a huge soft spot for YA lit.

  10. 10
    scott
    July 7th, 2011 19:29

    I think you mean “role”?

    That was my subtle reference to the 1980s D&D scare, of course!
    (Um, not really. Thanks.)

    Luckily, I was already in college when D&D was being banned. Back in the 70s, my school librarian ordered us expansion kits! Thus, I turned out a deviant.

  11. 11
    DianaH
    July 7th, 2011 19:34

    Simply great. Dialogues–between parents and kids, between kids and librarians, between parents and teachers–are key.

    Cosigned to the nth degree, a librarian and YA-loving sort-of grownup

  12. 12
    Kathy Love
    July 7th, 2011 19:37

    As a teenager of the 60′s I applaud the YA books and wish I could transport them back to when I needed them. Books can direct, heal, explain many diverse feelings that can’t be put into words by teenagers. Adults, ie Parents, should be using books as the jump off for discussion not yanking them away as the problem. Parents need this. Have they seen the news lately. Duh.

  13. 13
    Alissa
    July 7th, 2011 19:40

    Scott,
    As always, well written. I am the mom of a 16 year old, an advanced-reading 9 year old, and 7 year old. I read most of the books my girls do (though it is hard to keep up) and I brought them into the Nerdfighter community because I love what it stands for. I shared your books, John Green’s books, and many others after I read them and decided that they had important messages, that might be difficult, but that we could talk about them. I do not limit their reading as long as I know what they read and we talk about it.

    Thank you for your insight and, of course, your amazing books.

    Sincerely,
    Alissa
    DFTBA

  14. 14
    kaylen
    July 7th, 2011 19:45

    Someone will probably eat me alive for this, but I really wish we could have ratings on books like we have on movies. I’m not talking about censorship… just a simple, standard label with a rating and what to expect inside the book. I want to know if it’s just extreme violence and a little mild language or if I’m about to find myself reading border-line porn. My religious convictions cause me to flee from the latter so instead of reading a bunch of new and insightful YA novels, I find myself reading the same books over and over. I can’t trust what the internet says because people think that John Green is a pornographer and that Harry Potter is a direct connection to Satan. We used to have these “Scholastic Book Fairs” in elementary school. They gave me a book for free. The girl gets raped! In detail! I was nine! I was not prepared for that! A little, “Contains scenes of a mild sexual nature” would have been awesome.

  15. 15
    Filthy Victorian
    July 7th, 2011 19:53

    As a 17 year old girl who has been a devotee to all things YA fiction (books, signings, forums, fan fic, fan art, etc) for five years, I have definitely been a vocal part of the Twitter conversations on this matter. Yet, surprisingly, I never thought of bringing parents into this discussion. Perhaps it is because my parents are liberal, artistic people who are wholly supportive of my book obsession. But for teens who aren’t so lucky in that department, this blog entry makes so much sense. I am Canadian, so the WSJ does not have much sway around here, but I do wonder how many conversations were held between teens and their families after that terrible article was published. Hopefully, most teens were able to use their fangirling/fanboying (yes, sometimes awesome obsession has other uses) to show just how meaningful YA fiction is to so many readers; children, teenagers and adults, alike.

    It’s been said a million times, but YA most definitely saves. Because of YA authors, the reader is able to escape to worlds where the possibilities are endless, and no close-minded journalist can take that away from us.

    Kudos to Maureen Johnson, as well. I web streamed her radio interview yesterday, and although I knew most of her arguments from Twitter, I felt really proud of her for representing YA readers and writers in that light. Thank you, Scott-la, for always doing the same. (So, yeah, DFTBA).

  16. 16
    Ringo the Cat
    July 7th, 2011 19:58

    Wonderful post!
    As an ESL English teacher (Years 9-12), a part-time school librarian, nerdfighter, mother of a 3-year-old girl, and avid YA literature reader, this is the type of insightful post that I savour.
    I do not only want to read with my students and my daughter, I also want to provide them with the necessary handles so they can share their reading experiences with their parents. Some parents really do follow their teens reading habits (and read them together), but others, as you stated, don’t have a clue about what their children are reading.
    In a side note – and linked to what one of the commenters referred to – it is often ignorance that leads people to dismiss and condemn something, be that YA, video games, or certain types of music. Education is a must, and in this, also the teens have a certain responsibility to educate their parents ;-)

  17. 17
    Maria (BearMountainBooks)
    July 7th, 2011 20:41

    If WSJ is so concerned about dark literature for YA, why in the world didn’t they attack schools for required reading lists? 1984 was not “light.” Farenheit 451 wasn’t exactly utopia reading. Shakespeare for God’s sake. Yes, Suicidal Juliet is surely more upbeat than any modern books. “The Red Badge of Courage” will lift any YA reader to new heights. Then we have stories such as Moby Dick that might bring mental illness to mind.

    Yes, yes, today’s readings are so dark. Edgar Allen Poe anyone?

  18. 18
    Lindsey
    July 7th, 2011 20:52

    I love this! I listened to the radio piece yesterday and was really happy to hear Maureen saying pretty much everything I had already been thinking. I’m 26 but still love to indulge in reading some YA now and then because I know a few teens and like to know what they’re reading too so I can talk to them about books instead of mindless drivel. I had a conversation with my mom yesterday about the whole thing, and she pointed out that my sister and I read so much and at such a high level at a young age that she never worried about what we read, she was more concerned about peer pressure making us do something stupid. She has a good point. I think she also knew that if I questioned a book, I would come to her (or my dad) and ask about waht was bothering or confusing me. So teenagers of the world, don’t stop reading, keep talking, and stay smart. And if you don’t want to talk to your parents, there are other adults that would love to chat with you and help you get the most out of life!

  19. 19
    harmfulguy
    July 7th, 2011 20:54

    YA Fiction: Threat? Or Menace?

  20. 20
    thunderstrike78
    July 7th, 2011 21:02

    Great article. While listening to the radio show yesterday, I wanted to bring up every example in history of a new medium or genre being demonized in the name of “think of the children”! The D&D angle didn’t even occur to me–I was thinking of the whole attack on the comic book industry that ultimately led to the creation of the Comics Code Authority. Nothing sells newspapers or gets people elected better than plain old fear-mongering.

  21. 21
    Lillian
    July 7th, 2011 21:05

    Scott,
    Thank you for writing this post. I LOVE it that you are giving teenagers the power, and the responsibility, to talk to their parents.

  22. 22
    Vanessa
    July 7th, 2011 21:15

    I guess I find it silly that the WSJ is assuming that YA books are only read by a specific age group.
    When I was that age, there weren’t books specific to YA. I read anything I could get my hands on! Biographies, Agatha Christie, kids books, adult books, whatever.
    I was forced to read “Where the Red Fern Grows” for school, (I hate books where animals die) but was excited to be assigned “1984″, “Madame Bovary”, and “The Maltese Falcon”. None of these are light books!
    If I didn’t feel comfortable with a book, I’d skip to the back, to see how it resolved, and go on to the next one.
    Give the teens some credit! I doubt that any of these scandalous YA books are bringing up topics they don’t hear about in school, and I’m sure the books feature a much more well rounded discussion of the topics than “Jimmy from english class” would come up with.

  23. 23
    MKHutchins
    July 7th, 2011 21:20

    My mom watched us play a DnD session when I was a teenager. “So you sit around, roll dice, and drink Sprite?” “Yup, that’s about it.” “Sounds like a great way to stay out of trouble!”

    @Kaylen — I don’t think there’s a need for standardized ratings, but there are review websites that include comments for content. My favorite (which has a slew of YA) is http://www.bookshoptalk.com/. As a reader, I find it a valuable tool to know if a book is going to be a good fit for me.

  24. 24
    Mallory
    July 7th, 2011 21:49

    So for the most part everyone has basically said what I feel about the subject. Although I had never really thought about bringing the parents into the discussion. I’m currently an elementary school librarian hoping for a middle or high school library position in the next few years, but I do have many 4th and 5th grade students (especially advanced readers) who are starting to delve into YA lit (I’ve talked a bunch of them into reading Leviathan. They love it!). But now I’m thinking it would be awesome to send home a pamphlet or have a discussion with parents about what to expect as their kids grow up and start to really get into YA lit. Hmm… excitement!

    One of the things that sticks out to me is how parents worry about what their kids can and cannot handle with YA lit. Yes, there are some pretty dark books. And in this case I feel like teenagers need to be given more credit. I fully believe that kids are good at choosing what they can and cannot handle on their own. I was a 15-year-old ten years ago, and I can remember reading books that got to be too much for me, so I just stopped reading them and found something else that I could handle. Teenagers are quite capable of deciding on their own what they should and should not be reading and I think parents just need to accept that.

    And I wouldn’t be wholly apposed to a rating system. Mangas have them and it would make my life a bit easier when choosing books for my library, but the rating would need to be a combination of appropriate age range and content (because a book could be as squicky clean as can be, but if there are big words that younger kids don’t understand, then it’s not a good fit for them)

  25. 25
    khoela-chan
    July 7th, 2011 22:09

    A rating system would be a good idea, actually. However, it would need more than G, PG, PG13, and R. Having two ratings would be nice: one for content, one for reading level. Also, they would need to be pretty specific: an age level alone would not be enough for content.

  26. 26
    Gamila
    July 7th, 2011 22:10

    I knew you were awesome, but this post just confirms it. This is the most common sense I’ve heard out of anyone discussing this argument. I love the idea that teens go to their parents and share what they have been reading with them. Sure, there are a lot of books with some nasty stuff out there, but there are a ton of good books too. For example, yours are great and when my babies get old enough to read I can’t wait to share all my favorite YA stories with them. Especially the Leviathan series because it has added so much fun and a new interest to my life. (Go steampunk!)

    Anyway, YA has always had a darkside. I think the problem here is that people always want to put the YA genre into absolutes so they don’t have to bear the responsibility of being smart about what they read. If all of YA is dark and evil then they can just avoid the whole genre all together. This is obviously a very dumb idea, but in some ways it is easier than researching every book you read for bad content.

    I don’t necessarily agree with the commenter that said books should have content lables but parents and teens should have resources avaliable so they can make informed decisons about what they are getting into when they pick up a book. As you said that is much easier now that the internet is around. There are now a ton of blogs dedicated to clean reads and rating books by content. I am so happy to live in the internet age.

  27. 27
    The Joker-la
    July 7th, 2011 22:25

    Ay, kaylen! How shall I put this? They shouldn’t rate books, they shouldn’t rate movies, they shouldn’t rate anything! Why? Because half of the MPAA’s ratings are misrepresentative. They rate The Assassanation of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford as an R, yet much more violent and exploitive films like Sucker Punch get a PG-13! It’s not a very good system. They care more about sex and nudity than violence. Does that sound right? Which are YOU more disturbed by?

  28. 28
    kay101
    July 7th, 2011 22:29

    The woman who wrote that article for the WSJ is very wrong. I am a teen myself who adores YA and I want to devote my life to writing it.

    YA is great for many reasons, and one reason is that all the YA novels out there help capture the voice and emotion, and also many of the issues that face young people today. As the world changes, it’s a wonderful thing to be able to have keepsakes of what the world may have been like for us youths. In 100 years, our great grand children can read some of the YA novels that are popular today and think, “Wow, my great grandmother may have had something like this happen to her” or “Gee, I wonder if my great grandfather ever had to deal with a problem like this?” A lot of what YA is doing is getting into the hearts of today’s young people, and the many issues we face.

    Also, what does the woman who wrote the article propose we young people do INSTEAD of reading YA lit? Should we read adult books now, that in many cases contain much more mature content than YA books? Or should we just abandon reading all together and watch TV and drive fast cars and get ourselves into all sorts of reckless situations, a la Fahrenheit 451? We can’t let the next generation lose the benefits and glory of reading and abandon it for the digital age! Reading is a great thing and it’s wonderful that many authors, bloggers, librarians, and other forms of YA fandom have devoted themselves into making sure that the teens of today value and treasure reading.

  29. 29
    lucero41
    July 7th, 2011 22:30

    Scott,

    I am a 47 yr old Mom (16 & 9) and I am a bigger fan of YA books than my own daughter who introduced me to them, I am the one following authors, blogs, ect. buying and reading them, I am sure there are many other parents like me, and I never, ever pay attention to unfounded critisism of anything, I think YA brings parents & teenagers together if you let it, something to share, talk about and love.

    Thank you for your thoughts in this article and by the way, I also love your books.

  30. 30
    Shanella
    July 7th, 2011 22:54

    I applaud this entry! I hope when I grow up (I’m 28) I’ll remember this.

    Also, I really want “the Twitter machine” to be a thing. To the Twitter Machine!

  31. 31
    Katie Mundie Moms
    July 7th, 2011 22:58

    Thank you so much for writing this and sharing your thoughts with us. I really enjoyed your article and agree with what you said. I’m a parent who not only reads and reviews YA books, but I’m going to be talking to my kids about what they’re reading. I think it’s amazing that there is such a diverse selection of YA books for teens now days. Not only are more teens reading, but more parents are able to connect with their kids through books. I wish I had a fraction of the YA books that are out now when I was a teen.

  32. 32
    Gladys O.
    July 7th, 2011 23:11

    Certainly, I don’t understand why people may have a view like this on YA literature. I agree with all the points that you made.

    As a teen, basically all the “dark” elements that are portrayed in YA lit are basically things that a teenager goes through in real life. Sometimes books sugar coat things but, trust me, it’s a dark tempting world for a teenager in the real world. People that think that YA lit contains too many inappropriate things should really pay attention to what is going on in a teenagers real life situation. It’s a lot worse.

    Oh, adults… And sometimes they wonder why we can’t get along with them.

  33. 33
    Cathy DeSimone
    July 7th, 2011 23:16

    Awesome!

    I am a 55 year old teacher of junior & senior high school students who tell me I should be reading this or that. I have read a lot of extremely good YA books the last seven years that I have been teaching this age group! I will share this blog with my students and their parents!

    Thanks!

  34. 34
    Elizabeth Rodriguez
    July 7th, 2011 23:19

    Thank you for article. I am the mother of three boys and I also have a YA book blog. I like to believe that my love for reading is something that my kids will learn by example. I know what they read because I take them to the library and the bookstore and sometimes we even share the same books. I think this is a great way to connect with your children, but still be the parent. Just as you wouldn’t allow a six year old to watch a movie that is rated ‘R’, you should supervise what your kids read, view on TV or the Internet, and the video games they play.

  35. 35
    Rebecca
    July 7th, 2011 23:22

    I remember the whole “Harry Potter is satanic and has spells from the occult detailed in the books” craze and I know personally the damage it did for my parents to listen to the extremists. They banned the books from our house (the movies as well) and didn’t even glimpse them over to see if the accusations were true. Later, when I had moved out my boyfriend (now husband) let me borrow his copies of the books and I read every page from Philosopher’s Stone to Half-Blood Prince in one month’s span–would have been less if it weren’t for my job *grumble stupid job getting in the way of Harry Potter and me*. I was engrossed in the beautiful world JK Rowling had created. There was nothing harmful–at all–within those pages. So in the end my parents lost credibility and I gained a magical world that I can never share with them because they still firmly believe in what those extremists told them.

  36. 36
    W.G. Cambron
    July 7th, 2011 23:31

    Parents today overract over everything. Not just parents, but everyone. If I had kids I’d be happy that they would be able to read! Lord knows the school systems don’t teach you anything (I’m so glad to be in college, lol).
    You raised some great points, Mr. Westerfield. Thank you for posting.

  37. 37
    Susan Petroulas / Suelder
    July 7th, 2011 23:31

    This is so not a new argument. In the ’60′s and ’70′s, Bruno Bettleheim argued against banning fairy tales, like the Brothers’ Grimm in an article called “So the Witch Won’t Eat Me.”

    Kids know there are bad things in the world – Grimm’s Fairy Tales and now the darker YA literature just don’t sweep them under the rug. They help the kids deal with the witches, cutters, bad guys. Because most of the time, the witches don’t win. (well, the bad witches don’t)

    Suelder

  38. 38
    Beccachan
    July 7th, 2011 23:40

    I love this article so much! I wish I could have heard this when I was younger. My parents were the kind of parents who forbade me to read Harry Potter. Fortunately for me, I had an amazing aunt who had the same arguments as you and bought me Goblet of Fire for my birthday (haha without my parents knowing!). She was the one who really opened the world of YA novels to me and I will always be grateful to her.

    I really hope that teens do start talking to their parents, and their parents stay open minded. Once I got a little older and started talking to my parents about the books I loved, they really listened and started to mind less the many times they had to take me to the library.

    I hope no kids have to be deprived from the books they love.

  39. 39
    Jennifer
    July 7th, 2011 23:53

    Wonderful post. Thank you. As a library-working mom, I am appalled when someone implies that there is “nothing good” or “nothing appropriate” for them or their child. In my opinion, this person/these people are not trying. At all. End of story. There are SO many great stories out there, and so many of them are completely appropriate for you or your child. You just have to try.

  40. 40
    Jennifer C.
    July 7th, 2011 23:56

    Thank you for writing this response to all the madness with the WSJ article. I was just explaining yesterday that the parents just need to talk to their children about what they are reading and about real life. Talking to your family may seem like a weird solution but I bet it is the best one.

  41. 41
    Loren
    July 8th, 2011 00:07

    Not for nothing….this is not a new debate…. as a parent and lover of the YA dystopic genre, I must say I have no idea what a lot of the references mean…NaNoWriMo, the nerdfighter hand signal, fan fic, Snape dub-con Mpreg epic poetry…. (SMH) That being said, I am just so happy that kids are READING….this is what’s most important!! I have 3 young kids and I hope they continue their love for reading… whatever it may be…. and whatever may be written, hidden or implied within the pages of ANY book is NOTHING compared to the violent XBox/Wii/Playstation games that their parents purchase FOR them, or the brain cell frying cartoons they watch on Cartoon Network for hours and hours on end…..

  42. 42
    Eric
    July 8th, 2011 00:25

    I have to read the Wall Street Journal often for work, and it is usually insightful, detailed, and fact checked. So I would say this article is an outlier. However, with that being said, the WSJ was bought by News Corp in ’07 — the same company that announced today that it is shutting down another one of its newspapers after a phone hacking scandal. So maybe the quality of the paper is just starting to succumb to the Rupert Murdoch effect…

  43. 43
    Ian McKinney
    July 8th, 2011 00:25

    I lived through the “D&D is evil” period. Then I grew up to be a librarian in a library system that orders roleplaying games fairly extensively. And the evilsayers are nowhere to be found! Well, technically, they’ve just moved on to attempting to ban/censor YA literature …

  44. 44
    Jessi
    July 8th, 2011 01:16

    You are a genius!
    My parents are ok with YA books, but not some adult books. But adult books can be really graphic. Gr.
    Aw well, this could still be helpful, and my little brother could use it for sure! :)
    I remember that at my elementary school, one book was banned because in it someone kills a baby (with a chemical shot, so it’s not graphic) but guess what book showed up in the library, along with two sequels?
    Thanks though! That’s helpful!

  45. 45
    Rebecca
    July 8th, 2011 01:28

    This article seems to think that these ‘dark’ examples of YA are only useful for those teens who are already troubled. But even those of us who had a happy, healthy childhood (yes, it happens) can find them useful.

    Sooner or later, everyone will have a friend or family member who self harms, has a drug problem, has been is or currently in an abusive situation, is depressed, is bi-polar, is suicidal, and/or has been raped.

    Reading the stories of others in such situations helps us to understand, and isn’t that the point anyway?

    Books are different than TV and movies because books let us get into the characters’ heads, and while I do believe that ‘reader discretion’ has its place, by the time a child is 14 or 15, they should know that most of this stuff exists anyway. They see the news. The wonderful thing about books (and other media to a lesser extend) is that they let us explore situations and courses of action with out actually being bound to them and experiencing the consequences in real life.

    I’m 22. I’m not a teenager anymore, but I’m not old enough to be a parent. Parents should take an interest in what their kids read, but they should do this even if they know their children read nothing but the least offensive books out there. But they shouldn’t panic– Most teens who read a lot are too busy reading to get into trouble.

  46. 46
    Eileen
    July 8th, 2011 01:37

    Woah my gosh, rant! Only, I don’t like the fact that you were attempting so fervently to associate WSJ with alarmism. That’s not what the paper is about, and WSJ wouldn’t be associated with it at all if it weren’t for the durn, new entertainment sections.

  47. 47
    Alli-wa
    July 8th, 2011 01:37

    I am sixteen years old. When I wake up in the mornings, I glance through WSJ while eating my breakfast. I find it interesting most times, but when I read the article in question, I was disappointed. I looked back upon the books I enjoyed and read recently, and found that the article took a niche of YA literature and implied that a majority of the vast world of YA lit is like that. Because really, it isn’t. There’s sci-fi, and fantasy, and dystopias, and steampunk, as well as tradition teen romances and chick lit. And as Maureen (iirc) expertly stated, it can be as fast as the world of adult fiction.

    I haven’t been in a bookstore for a few months (I make frequent visits to my library), but the last time I checked, the shelves in the YA area weren’t completely bursting with books about teen despairity. As I mentioned before, YA has a variety of genres. I’m sure if I were interested in something such as abuse novels I could seek them out, but they don’t appeal to me. My parents have trusted my reading choices, and I love them for that (and a lot else). They’ve taught me to make good choices, and I think that even if I did read abuse novels, I wouldn’t be compelled to take the route of the characters. Reading about Shay’s way of staying bubbly in Pretties did not turn me into a cutter or make me want to try cutting just for the fun of it.

    Part of growing up is learning how to use judgment accordingly as well as making one’s own choices. And while I think that parents should be actively involved in what their child is reading (my mom read the Uglies trilogy as I was reading it a few years ago and has read other books of mine), they cannot make all of their child’s reading choices. If a parent is concerned about what their child is reading, they should read the book in question instead of making judgments based on excerpts or reviews only. If still worried, they can then open a discussion with their teen. Yes, teenagers do stupid things, but many can make good choices and many without teens may fail to recognize this.

    The only thing that bugged me about that radio discussion was that guy at the end who was going on about violent cartoon movies. JUST BECAUSE A FILM IS ANIMATED DOES NOT MEAN IT WILL BE HAPPY. You can’t judge a book by its cover.

    I think the bookworm girl they talked to though is my brain twin or something, seriously. I just finished Maureen’s “Girl at Sea” and am about to start “To Kill a Mockingbird.” o.O

    Long comment is long.

  48. 48
    Books Before Boys
    July 8th, 2011 01:43

    That was interesting. I had no idea how some parents felt about YA. I’m a teenager who reads a lot and my parents like it. My parents know the subject matter of what I read. I read all kinds of books, some of which are dark like biographies about Judy Garland and the Bell Jar. I also read happy stories, too. I read because it inspires me and I love to hear the messages that authors are secretly trying to tell us. My parents understand that. I don’t know many people who do read. I know even less people who read YA. This posting was interesting because I had know idea how adults felt about what their children were reading. Most books are written for pure entertainment or to send a message. I don’t think the message is usually to go and hurt yourself.

    I agree with Rebecca.

  49. 49
    Dee
    July 8th, 2011 01:45

    You know what was really damaging – Sweet Valley High. I could never be as perfect as those blonde twins. Current YA lit speaks to so many teens (and adults) in a way that the stuff in the 80′s didn’t even try to.
    Oh, and this blog post has further exacerbated my Westerfeld author-crush!

  50. 50
    Alison's Book Marks
    July 8th, 2011 02:03

    I don’t know which I love more, this post or your commenters below it!

  51. 51
    Rebecca
    July 8th, 2011 02:17

    Aaaannnnddd this is why I’m glad my parents don’t speak English ^_^

    Oh a slightly more serious note, I guess I’m pretty much used to it by now. My parents are especially worried about violent video games (this applies to my brother though… I can’t play FPS games to save my life), but they’re fine with me watching violent anime or reading YA because they were exposed to it very early on. I can also tell you from experience that it’s really, REALLY hard to tell your parents about it – after all, are you going to listen to the “authority” on t.v or your “impressionable” kids? – but you HAVE to try. They STILL don’t believe a word I have to say about violent video games, but I like to think that one day – ONE DAY – they will be able to at least SEE my side of the argument.

    Here’s hoping.

  52. 52
    Books Before Boys
    July 8th, 2011 04:12

    The parents want to protect their kids, but what they don’t realize is that we won’t be children forever. We’ll grow up and do grown up things like driving and working and marriage and other things. Sometimes, you have to let your kids grow. Don’t shield them from the world. The world is scary and nothing should be a secret. By learning about these things at a young age, we could be able to make a difference in the world.

  53. 53
    Felix Phillips
    July 8th, 2011 06:25

    Hi Scott,

    Thanks for the post, I am doing some research right now in grad school on adolescent lit and development. I am also interested in why so many adults, myself included, read YA lit. Do you think that the presence of a large adult audience influences themes in YA lit?

    I’m all for a wide variety of books for teens. I believe literature has a way of speaking to all of us that is raw, real, and important. There is magic in introducing a friend to a book or a character you know they will love. Many adults forget what being a teen is like, or underestimate how dark life can be, or feel, at any age.

    That being said, I do not think that booksellers or publishers (the relatively new ‘Harlequin Teen’ division springs to mind) are overly concerned with the messages and themes in their books, and what their impact might be. We are all of us impressionable, and social things. Messages, both intentional and unintentional, are received.

    But as you pointed out, parents are the key here. Any book can provide a wonderful springboard for conversation. Everyone reads with their toddlers, why not with their teens as well?

  54. 54
    Kailey-wa
    July 8th, 2011 06:26

    This is a beautiful post, Scott-la. I am always impressed with how you always succeed in articulating your thoughts so clearly and coming right the heart of the issue. Also, I’ve just read through all the comments, and everyone’s personal thoughts are so interesting that I want to share some of mine.

    My mom is a big reader like me, so when it comes to YA she fully supports my reading anything and everything. She trusts me, so she doesn’t usually bother with trying to censor me; she assumes I make good judgments. So I was quite surprised when she decided she wanted to read a certain YA series that another adult has suggested for me before I was allowed to read it. I was even more surprised when she announced her verdict: it was “too much” and “just yucky to read,” (I’m still not sure if she was referring to the language or the content), and she didn’t want me reading it. That being said, if I had really fought to read it she probably would have let me; I was just so surprised that she had decided to dictate what I read, and I felt a little guilty that a lot of the things I read, if she bothered to look through them, she would probably also decide to screen, if she used the same standards she did with this series.

    That being said, I’ve recently introduced her to the entire Harry Potter fandom, as she and I are attending LeakyCon next week. I had her read all the books and am showing her my favorite wizard rock and talking her through a lot of other parts of the fandom that she didn’t even know existed. It really surprises me still when she doesn’t understand even the definition of some things that seem like basics to me, like podcasts and fanfic. She knows that I obsess over YA; she’s driven me to enough book signings to get that it’s highly important to me. But I hope that bringing her to LeakyCon will help her better understand some of the other parts of YA fandoms that make us YA readers who we are. So this helping parents understand thing might not be easy; but I think it’s definitely a step in the right direction.

    DFTBA, everybody!

  55. 55
    The Joker-la
    July 8th, 2011 08:02

    And I somehow forgot to mention that this is a great post, Scott-la.

  56. 56
    missoularedhead
    July 8th, 2011 11:14

    Thanks for this. Funnily enough, I was a voracious reader when I was a teenager, and read everything I could get my hands on. Gary Jennings’ Aztec, Norman Mailer, Judy Blume’s ‘soft core’ stuff, james Clavell, Tolkien…my parents, seriously conservative, church-going types, never said a word. They let me read any and everything, and I turned out just fine. My issues had nothing to do with what I read in books.
    And now, as a mother myself, I have made the same decision. My daughter knows what she likes, and reads it. She knows what she doesn’t like, and doesn’t. And she’s not a cutter, depressed, or suicidal. Does she dress like a goth princess? Some days, sure. But she dressed like that when she was still reading the Warrior series. Somehow, i don’t think feral cats who act like Native Americans turned her into a goth…

  57. 57
    Kiera
    July 8th, 2011 16:08

    I love this post, Scott. I can’t say much of anything that hasn’t already been said but I will say that I think it’s good to let parents know what their kids are reading and for them to talk about what they don’t want their kids reading for whatever reason. My mom and I read the same books all the time when she gets the time to sit and read. Heaven forbid we corrupt each other. ;)

  58. 58
    Heather
    July 8th, 2011 16:46

    I will be sharing the link on facebook.

  59. 59
    Jetteh-loves-you-Scott-la
    July 8th, 2011 18:03

    I mostly skimmed over this journal cuz it was kinda confusing but I got the point. I’m lucky because my parents are okay with pretty much whatever I’m reading even though they think I should at least read HISTORICAL fiction rather then the kind I normally read (gues what my answer is? “AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAAA!!!!! LEVIATHAN IS HISTORICAL FICTION!!!!”) which is Harry Potter, blah, blah, blah. If other adults would ask me why I read YA, I would answer, “‘Cause this is better then most other crap. Like pure romance novels with the creepy covers.”
    “Maybe you should-”
    “I’LL READ WHATEVER THE HELL I WANT TOO, BITCHES!”

  60. 60
    Hannah0-la
    July 8th, 2011 19:25

    I completely agree. I thank God that I have a mother who understands what I read and trusts me to have discretion on what to read.

    I think the same thing kind of applies to Harry Potter – maybe that’s why I really connected with this post. I adore HP, but I know a lot of people who think it’s ‘evil’, which drives me NUTS because they have no idea what they’re talking about and get their opinions from other people.

    Thanks for writing this. :)

    DFTBA!
    ~Hannah-la

  61. 61
    Rebecca
    July 8th, 2011 19:50

    When everyone was freaked out over Harry Potter being ‘evil’, my brother was in 2nd grade at a christian school, and I was in kindergarten, and set to got to the same school the next year, but then the teachers at the school told my brother he’d get in trouble if he brought his Harry Potter book to school again, so my parents (who both love Harry Potter as much as my brother and I do) took my brother out of the christian school and sent him to public school for 3-5 grade and sent me to the public school, too, for 1-5 grade. (and public school thereafter) . So, luckily, I don’t really have anything to worry about with my mum getting upset with my books, she’s almost as much of an avid reader as I am (I say almost because she also has to work, it slows her down some :) ) and she’ll support my reading if ‘dark’ books start to get banned or something. She’s not a nerdfighter (yet…) but she likes John Green’s books, and if I really like a YA book, then I’ll recommend it to her to read. If I had a mum who refused to let me read YA books, then I would probably go insane. Or just read a million pounds of fanfiction of the books I did manage to read.

  62. 62
    MKHutchins
    July 8th, 2011 22:54

    I like that people keep mentioning the good parents they have. :) That’s how my parents were: they didn’t dictate, but they were involved in my life and taught me how to make good choices for myself.

    Maybe we hear about the crummy parents so often because it’s much more dramatic.

  63. 63
    Edward V
    July 8th, 2011 22:57

    I select the books I want, add them to cart, and have my mother input her credit information and I get my demon YA in 1 to 2 weeks. They generally look the other way when I get books. If my parents did care what I read and didn’t allow me to read the books that I do, well, I know where they keep their credit cards. ;)

  64. 64
    AeroRace
    July 8th, 2011 23:42

    This was a very good read that makes me feel lucky my mom trusts me to read whatever I want [well, with the exception of *ahem* adult novels,] without being easily influenced. Aside from that, a lot of novels that have these issues that parents may be concerned about [eg. cutting] are real-life problems of our everyday peers. Should we have to ignore these issues? How silly it is to think that not reading these books would prevent such problems. Society in general made us young adults this way, not novels. Heck, any of these dark novels typically tell me how terrible the lives of the people in the books are, and thus it has the opposite effect, making me thing “I don’t want to end up like this.”

    Although I must say, I don’t think I will ever talk to my mom about fanfiction… hehe.

  65. 65
    Melanie
    July 9th, 2011 00:19

    This is great! And I want to say that the only reason I’m a reader is because of a book my MOM picked out at the library years and years ago that was YA – and actually SHE was going to read it. :) And now I read everything from old school literature to manga to YA novels.

    And I still give summaries to my mom when I really like a book. It makes me smile when she says, “Doesn’t sound like my type of book,” and yet she’ll let me finish my long and overly dramatic rants. I will be reading YA novels until I’m dead. :)

  66. 66
    Queen B
    July 9th, 2011 00:31

    I totally agree with your post, Scott-la! What parents and adults don’t always understand is that yes, kids do soak up what ever they hear, read and see, but they pay just as much (or more)attention to things they aren’t allowed to do. If a parent doesn’t explain things to their child or give then the resourses (books) to find out themselves, they’ll look for answers someplace else. Fortunatly, I am growing up in a wonderful home environment(I’m 14) were my parents trust me to make my own choices. I know what I’m going to do with my life already, which is a big diffrence from some of my classmates. And although books help me see what I want to do, they also let me see what NOT to do. I know what happens when you make bad choices without having to try it myself.
    I also think that Rad Bradbury has a good point in Farenhiet 451, when he writes, “The same things could be in the ‘parlor families’ today. The same infinite detail and awareness could be projected through the radios and televisors but are not. No, no, it’s not books at all you’re looking for! Take it where you can find it, in old phonograph records, old motion pictures, and in old friends; look for it in nature and look for it in yourself”(http://www.karenika.com/book/451.html). Thank goodness we aren’t there yet, but it is getting harder to find a show on TV that has the same elements as a book.
    Parents and their kids should work together to find books that they both enjoy. Every summer, my mom reads aloud to my 19-year-old brother and me. We all love it. And, as a matter of fact, my DAD was the one who introduced me to Leviathan! Now it’s my favorite series EVER. Thank you for writing this post and for being a barking amazing author!

  67. 67
    Books Before Boys
    July 9th, 2011 01:15

    Parents need to have some trust in their children.

  68. 68
    The Joker-la
    July 9th, 2011 03:39

    I just reread this. This really is a wonderful post, Mr. Westerfeld. Truely genius. A majestic accomplishment. Worthy of fame and glory, like Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. Well done. Just had a lot of Red Bull. Real pumped up. I’ll shut up.

  69. 69
    alice
    July 9th, 2011 07:54

    HEY Y’ALL! I know i said that i wouldnt be commenting for the entire summer but this is a temporary exception, not like anyone noticed. I’m sooo angry I missed so much. But it is great to check in and see this amazin’ post from Scott. I am deeply moved sir, just thought you should know that.

    @Joker-la: Similar things are happening to me but came to me in a form of a 2 liter of Mountain Dew.

  70. 70
    Clankinist
    July 9th, 2011 10:03

    Dude. That was deep, Scottmeister.

  71. 71
    Ashly
    July 9th, 2011 19:36

    Loved this comment!

    I love YA lit. I read it constantly. It has come such a long way tapping into so many teens’ needs. C.S. Lewis once said, “We read to know that we are not alone.” Teen lit does just that. Teens don’t feel like “freaks” or “outcasts” anymore.

    Hurray for teen lit. Keep it coming.

    I’m 28, and have been a teen librarian for six years! Can’t get enough!

  72. 72
    freebooter4ever
    July 9th, 2011 22:09

    Sometimes I wonder if adults forget what it was like to be teenagers. Seriously, ‘too dark and depressing’? What do they think, teenage life is all rainbows and unicorns? Goodness, escaping into books was the only way I survived high school!
    Awesome post, I wish more parents would read your blog and try to understand YA!

  73. 73
    lily-wa
    July 10th, 2011 02:21

    @kaylen book ratings would be FABULOUS. it’s hard to tell by the description on the back or by word of mouth what kind of content it will have. i hate getting really into a story and then it gets extremely innapropriate so that i don’t even want to finish! knowing about language, violence, and sexual content BEFORE im in the middle of a story would be soooo helpful. i love reading new books but im so hesitant to start reading new authors because you never know what might be shelved in the teen or children’s section when it should be for adults

  74. 74
    yanara
    July 10th, 2011 04:15

    sometimes people can be exceedingly thick.
    ok so there’s some crappy YA Lit out there, (I am getting tired of seeing nothing but vampire romance novels every flippin’ time I go to the book store ) but there’s also some really awesome books. Some parents are so paranoid about their kids getting into drug they only see the bad things and miss everything good. (not like I’m saying vampire romance novels are bad they just drive me insane, personally)
    oh and I would just like to say me and my Ma read alot of the same books cause the YA fiction is almost always better then the adult fiction.

    PS. VAMPIRES BURN IN THE SUN, PEOPLE!!!!!!!!
    PPS. no offense to anyone <3

  75. 75
    Zackattack
    July 10th, 2011 06:24

    you know what that was a good post scott-la
    anyways i completely agree with the fact that teens are smart. the thing is, i sort of almost WANT to agree with parents, i get where theyre comming from and what they think about everything. honestly, ive read practically everything scott-la wrote and i love it. but ive also read a lot of “dark” and “depressing” books. what the parents dont get is that theyre stereotyping all teens.
    im actually getting my mom to read leviathan:D my older sister had convinced her to read hunger games, so i said “mom! if you read that you have to read leviathan!!!!!” so she is.
    my mom actually thinks scott’la is cool. which is why i love her:D

  76. 76
    Winston Churchill
    July 10th, 2011 07:18

    This has nothing to do with the blog post, but no one has noticed this small detail in “Crashing a Bash” that may give us the answer as to whether or not it’s real. On all of the Goliath art we’ve seen except for that one, there has always been a small box with Keith Thompson’s initials, K.T., and the year the art was created, which was ’11 for “Crashing a Bash” and ’10 for everything else. We know it was made fairly recently. Has anyone else seen this? Does it mean anything?

  77. 77
    Anita
    July 10th, 2011 08:14

    After reading this post, I sort went through a mental list of all the YA books I’ve read. And they weren’t anything dark and sad or anything like that (actually, not fully true, since some of them WERE sad at the end). But I can see how if your kid doesn’t talk to you about what they read, then media feeding parental fears will hit you hard and make you worried. I found this blog post very…encouraging in having people teach their parents about their awesomeness and everything they do with YA lit

  78. 78
    Kailey-wa
    July 10th, 2011 10:34

    I’m going to be off the blog for the next week due to LeakyCon…I’m leaving in 5 hours for the airport….just wanted you to know, Scott-la, that I’ll be at all your panels, and I especially can’t wait for the special one with all the announcements! I’ll be the one freaking out in hopefully the front row, wearing a bowler hat and knee socks and with partially blue hair (sort of my signature look ;) ). I’ve packed all your books to get them signed but I’m scared they’ll say my bag’s too heavy!!!

  79. 79
    Ren W.
    July 10th, 2011 18:50

    I completely agree. I know of some parents who shun me (I HAVE written a YA book also) because I read YA novels. I may ask one of my friends, “Hey, read Uglies, it has an amazing message.” But her parents swooped in and will not allow her to read it for fear of a “Darker message.” Ugh. Although my parents are the cool twiiter hashtag loving people, I know of other who aren’t. Like my mom for instance, she LOVED Scott on his Behemoth tour and found him really funny and nice. But other parents? They see Scott and other authors like Maureen as a threat to their children. Its ridiculous! We need to show adults who are against us why we love YA: not because of the werewolves, zombies, or vampires, but because of the postitive message underneath each novel. We love learning something by doing what we love, and if we’re shunned for it? So be it. This seems to be exactly how parents reacted to Harry Potter. I went to see it in theaters with my little brother who was eight (EIGHT!!!!) and parents were outside the theater telling us that we’d go to hell for reading and seeing it. I don’t know. Damage seems to be coming from the parents, not the books. If we can get them to understand, then we would start a reading revolution. Scott brings up valid points, and we need to fight book critisism by parents and adults who have never even read a YA novel! Book racism is horrible, and it needs to STOP.

    P.S. I have read over 400 YA books and still don’t know what DFTBA means… Explain? Oh, and how on earth do you do the nerdfighter hand symbol thing? Thanks!!

  80. 80
    alice
    July 10th, 2011 20:46

    I just took the time to read all the comments.I’m lazy.

    @Kaylen: The book where the girl gets raped wouldnt happen to be that julia of the wolves book would it? Cuz I was required to read that in 4th grade. Scarred for life.

    @Jetteh; COULDN’T AGREE MORE!!!!! XD Action/Adventure books w/ just a little splash of romance, basically YA. And them covers are really creepy.

  81. 81
    Melie-wa
    July 10th, 2011 21:49

    Hi, Anyway i read YA books. If you read inside the cover of some of these books it reads: ages 14 and up. I my self am only 13. yes i will admit the books i read are about sex and drugs, but the kids(teens) who are influenced are usaly immature. you have to be able to handle the things you read. so even if your 17(and Immature) you shouldent read books like this. There is a comment above(27) (The Joker-la) that says that the people who rate movies rate them on sex and nudity not violence. the reason for this is because most people can handle violence only mature people can handle sex and nudity.
    I rest my case.

  82. 82
    Melie-wa
    July 10th, 2011 22:32

    I reopen my case PEOPLE WHO CUT
    okay people who cut cut for fue reasons. here they are. One mental illness. they feel the need to cut because they need to feel something other than like they are weird or diffrent. Two pickedon/bullyed people. this is a real life example(I do Not cut). mostly girls. Girls like me start out thinking they are butiful, intellegent. most knowing they are not popular and never will be, but are happy with the friends they have. then one of there friends spreds a bad rumor. the girl soon luses her ego as more rumors spreed. then she is left with no friends and left to be cutters. They cut to relese there pain, to replace there pain. They want to feel good again. cutters are not influenced by books or movies. they are influenced by LIFE!

  83. 83
    TheWordMaster
    July 10th, 2011 22:59

    Ugh. Y’all have dragged me from my lovely couch in order to respond (I was going to wait…but I honestly have no life. So I’m doin this.)

    First off, I applaud you, Scott-La. You just said what I’ve been telling people forEVER.

    Now, I have no problem with reading books with what you might call “adult” level topics. Having read books such as Atlas Shrugged, Catcher in the Rye, and To Kill a Mockingbird, it really doesn’t bother me. What DOES however, is all the people who get their pants in a twist because they believe that all teenage books are filled with smut. Yes, i just said SMUT. I mean, REALLY? Have you actually READ the _______ books?! (I’ll let you insert an adjective in their for that one.) My mom likes the Hunger Games, AND my whole family reads Harry Potter. Is there something wrong with that?

    No?

    Good. Now stop complaining, Anti-YAs, or I shall….do something. -_-

    Now, back to sleep….

  84. 84
    Alison B
    July 11th, 2011 00:07

    Not related to the update, but I saw a poster in Kings Cross Station and immediatly thought of Scott Westerfeld:Either you love him or haven’t read him yet.

  85. 85
    Jacquie-la
    July 11th, 2011 19:38

    okay. Even though i’m barley a teenager (13 a hair away from 12) i’ve the hunger games and even though they do get violent the girl telling the story hates all the violence and wants to make it stop. So the theme of the book is ANTI-violence. of course, my dad just read the back cover and freaked out, so he finished the last book on kindle before i was halfway through! >=(

  86. 86
    Jacquie-la
    July 11th, 2011 19:40

    that was supposed to say i’ve READ the hunger games

  87. 87
    imageek
    July 12th, 2011 02:16

    Thank you so much for posting this!!!

    I am a teen, & I read almost everything I can get my hands on. A few years ago, I was banned for reading The Golden Compass. Neither of my parents had read it, but they were scared that I’d get “sacrilegious ideas” from the book. I went ahead & read the whole series, & experienced a wonderful story; although it displayed “sacrilegious ideas”, I needed to read & understand the whole book before I could make my own opinions about the content.

    See, the problem is that people often judge a book before they even finish it or realize why the author used certain devices. Take The Giver by Lois Lowry, for example. As soon as many parent readers get to the part where the main character kills a baby, they exclaim, “This book is not appropriate for children or teens!” They then immediately shut the book & go to their library or child’s school & demand that the book be banned. They don’t ever see the love shown by the main characters; they don’t see that the Giver & Jonah are trying to spread some good in the world. They don’t ever see that the author is trying to show that there cannot be only goodness in the world, there will always be some bad as well.

    I also read the WSJ, & although I didn’t come across this specific article, I remember reading another one about a year ago on the same subject. This one though was talking about how The Hunger Games & Wintergirls were incredible violent, inappropriate, disturbing, etc. What many adults do not understand is that although some teens cannot handle such material in books, some can handle it. Just because I read a book about a girl who is anorexic doesn’t mean that I’m going to become anorexic.

    It instead makes me aware of the illness. & honestly it’s kind of hypocritical of adults. They freak out about there being swearing, sex, violence in teen books, & then they don’t freak out about how all those subjects are also covered in adult books. They also need to tust their children’s judgment. I was reading a book a few months ago that I became uncomfortable with. I put it down, went on the Internet to find out how the book ends, & resolved to read the book once, if ever, I became comfortable with some of the ideas in it.

  88. 88
    hoverponies forever
    July 12th, 2011 17:24

    i must say… if my parent asked to borrow some of my books, I would freak out (having already read this post, I now know what they are up to). I don’t lend books to people, in general. Especially not my parents. I also feel like if I already own the book, there’s no point in screening it because I’ve already read it. And honestly, if the reason I was reading books that may be deemed “too dark” was that they convinced me to cut myself or something, then I could just as easily absorb that information from the internet. So while I appreciate that Scott-la is trying to stop parents from screaming their heads off about inappropriate books, it seems like it’s kind of too little too late. Thanks though!

  89. 89
    Laura
    July 12th, 2011 21:32

    Long-time lurker posting here to add yet another “right on!” to this post. And 26 year old library assistant and YA fic lover also commenting that, yes, Ms. Gurdon is totally missing the point.

    From the article “The argument in favor of such novels is that they validate the teen experience, giving voice to tortured adolescents who would otherwise be voiceless. If a teen has been abused, the logic follows, reading about another teen in the same straits will be comforting.”

    This is not my only argument for such novels. I argue in favor of novels that deal with difficult experiences many teens (and adults!) endure, not just because sometimes there is a little bit of comfort in reading about someone else going through the same thing as you. I argue in favor of these novels because they are enlightening. I argue in favor of these novels because for every kid that struggles with the ramifications of rape, bullying, abuse, depression, homelessness, eating disorders, racism (and many more) who will find a small comfort in being able to relate to a fictional character with a story similar to their own, there are kids who have no idea what it’s like to have to deal with these kinds of things. There are plenty of kids who are privileged enough to remain ignorant to the effects of a number of “isms”, ignorant to the real life problems of rape survivors, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. I should know, I was one of those lucky kids. These kids are not only ignorant to what happens, but they are ignorant to how it happens, why it happens, and why it’s a tragedy that these sorts of things continue in the 21st century. And they are not going to know, or more importantly, CARE, if no one tells them these stories. While these stories are comfort for some, they are also exposure to many others. Exposure is really really important for social issues. YA saves. Not just because it can bring comfort, but because it can bring sympathy, and eventually, understanding.

    Medical research is performed because doctors learned a long time ago that if they don’t know what’s wrong with someone, we can’t fix them, except by chance. If kids are our future, we can’t expect them to deal with the problems of the world if we keep them in the dark about them, except by chance. And much as it often depresses me and frustrates me, quite frankly, I still like this world a little too much to take that chance.

    Barking Spiders, as Deryn Sharp would say, if people aren’t meant to learn from books, what ARE we meant to learn from?

  90. 90
    nike store
    July 13th, 2011 10:18

    I know i said that i wouldnt be commenting for the entire summer but this is a temporary exception, not like anyone noticed.Maybe we hear about the crummy parents so often because it’s much more dramatic.
    Just had a lot of Red Bull. Real pumped up.

  91. 91
    Jacquie-la
    July 13th, 2011 17:41

    book banners! >:(

  92. 92
    fire makes me smile
    July 15th, 2011 06:48

    hm… my mother doesn’t read the Wall Street Journal, but she still seems to think that everything I read will somehow influence me badly. When I first read Leviathan and was in awe of how amazing it was and had to tell someone about it, I made the mistake of telling her. Now she seems to think that I want to be like Deryn and cut off my hair and dress like a boy and run away to join the airforce. I read a book called ‘the book theif’ (awesome reads) she decides, without even asking what it was about, that I would become a klepto and start stealing things. THAT ISN’T EVEN WHAT IT WAS ABOUT! mostly.

  93. 93
    CuteWhiteBunny
    July 16th, 2011 09:02

    I’m 17 and I’ve been reading for most of my life. Most of what I read now is YA, although there are some adult novels I pick up, too. Discworld, for example. I read just about anything I can get my hands on, really. As long as it interests me. Most of that happens to be YA, though.
    If a book sounds interesting, I will read it. That’s pretty much the rule I use for finding books to read. It leaves me with large piles of books from the library to work through. Another, more minor one: If I liked a book from an author, I will find others from the same author, because they’re usually as good, if not better.
    And if a book sounds boring, but someone tells me how good it is, I usually read it. Most of the time they’re right. That’s how I got into Redwall and Discworld.
    My mum hasn’t read most of the books I read, but she doesn’t object to anything I decide to read. She’d a reader too. In fact, my whole family are readers. I’ve always been encouraged to read, and it’s always been one of my favourite things to do.
    Although I probably won’t introduce her to fanfiction any time soon. ^^;

    At my primary school, there was a YA section in the school library, but it was restricted to the older students (you had to be at least 12 years old iirc). Which makes sense, as there were 5 year olds at the school, too, and they probably wouldn’t understand what most of the words meant.
    Not all YA books were in that section, though. Probably just the ones with more adult themes. Harry Potter was not restricted, except by availability (I remember not being able to find book 3 because someone else was always reading it). Even the last book was in the main part of the library.
    The first high school I went to, which was also Christian, was more restrivtive on the books in the library. Even then, there were still good books. But I started relying on the public library around about then, anyway, where I started lurking in the YA section.
    Now, I’m starting to move back to adult novels (which I first encountered through my parents when I was in primary school), although most of what I read is still YA.
    Without books, I would be bored out of my mind and probably killing my brain with bad TV.

    Books have never made me do anything other than laugh, cry or fangirl.

    I didn’t understand some of the references you used, but Google was my friend. So now I know. DFTBA.

  94. 94
    DR3W-la
    August 9th, 2011 05:59

    I like poptarts.. they are good… They are flaky and tasty.. And filled with goodness, They make people happy..after trying 2000 times, pop tart makers determined that 1.8 ounces is the most pop tarts could be and still pop up out of the toaster… Everyone LOVES poptarts.. There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores. Which i like the GingerBread poptarts, I rest my case MuthaFukkas

  95. 95
    DR3W-la
    August 9th, 2011 06:03

    Scott- 10 I think you are a bad author.. I read ALL the books and i didnt find them interesting.. You are a disgrace.. (:D

  96. 96
    DR3W-la
    August 9th, 2011 06:05

    There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.There are currently thirty-two flavors of Pop-Tarts. The most popular flavors are frosted strawberry, frosted brown sugar cinnamon, and s’mores.

  97. 97
    Melie-wa
    August 12th, 2011 03:28

    DR3W-la poptarts funny u no me Smores rule

  98. 98
    Mallory Fran
    August 14th, 2011 19:32

    Hey Scott and the other lovelies that follow comments.

    I’m not sure if anyone will actually read this comment, but I wanted to say how great I thought it was and point out a fun thing my mother, sister, and I do.

    My poor wonderful mother loves to read, but often gets swamped with requests from my sister and I and with the crazy world in general. She was also disappointed in our lack of reading the “classics” so she made this wonderful compromise.

    She would read a book of ours if we read a book of hers. I read “The Scarlet Pimpernel” while she read “Howl’s Moving Castle” and my sister read “Kidnapped” while my mother read “Piratica.” I plan on offering Leviathan next!

  99. 99
    DR3W-la
    August 16th, 2011 00:25

    Melie-wa ”Do ya like pancakes” :P LMAO

  100. 100
    Phyllis Chamberland
    December 11th, 2011 00:39

    Thanks god i got it, as i am in need of autocomplete for one of my project and here it is nice collection of useful stuff.

  101. 101
    Corie Scheiblich
    December 14th, 2011 16:39

    Enjoy complete videos for no cost

  102. 102
    Marcelina Lombard
    June 23rd, 2012 19:05

    Hi, i think that i saw you visited my weblog thus i came to “return the favor”.I’m attempting to find things to enhance my website!I suppose its ok to use some of your ideas!!

  103. 103
    Jacob Banks
    April 10th, 2013 07:40

    watch the newet movie scarymovie5 here:

Divider
Latest News
Manual of Aeronautics

The full-color art book for the Leviathan series, The Manual of Aeronautics, is out now!

Search the Site
Latest tweets
Facebook
Twitter
Contact

Click here to contact Scott Westerfeld.

Literary Agent

Jill Grinberg
Jill Grinberg Literary Management
info@jillgrinbergliterary.com

Bottom graphic
Content © 1997-2014 Scott Westerfeld | Powered by WordPress